The 18th ACM Symposium on Document Engineering

August 28, 2018 to August 31, 2018
Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

The following workshops and tutorial for DocEng 2018 have been confirmed.

Tutorials

Workshops

Keynotes

Gerald Penn,
Department of Computer Science,
University of Toronto
Gordon V. Cormack is a Professor in the David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science at the University of Waterloo, in Ontario, Canada. Prof. Cormack’s research and consulting activities focus on high-stakes information retrieval, including technology-assisted review, records management, quality assurance, and evaluation methodology. Prof. Cormack has published more than 100 scientific articles, including Technology-Assisted Review in E-Discovery Can Be More Effective and More Efficient Than Exhaustive Manual Review, which was published in the Richmond Journal of Law and Technology in 2011, and has been widely cited in case law, both in the U.S. and abroad. Prof. Cormack is co-author of Information Retrieval: Implementing and Evaluating Search Engines (MIT Press, 2010, 2016), which received Honorable Mention, 2010 American Publishers Award for Professional and Scholarly Excellence (PROSE) in the Computing and Information Sciences category. Prof. Cormack is a program committee member of The Text Retrieval Conference (TREC) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and has served as coordinator of its Spam Track (2005-2007), Legal Track (2010-2011), and Total Recall Track (2015-). Prof. Cormack is the co-inventor of the Continuous Active Learning (CAL) protocol, which he has used to conduct technology-assisted review for dozens of Fortune 500 clients.
Maura R. Grossman, J.D., Ph.D., is a Research Professor in the School of Computer Science at the University of Waterloo, and an Adjunct Professor both at Osgoode Hall Law School of York University and the Georgetown University Law Center. She also is Principal at Maura Grossman Law, an eDiscovery law and consulting firm in New York. Previously, Maura was Of Counsel at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, where, for 17 years, she advised the firm’s lawyers and clients on legal, technical, and strategic issues involving eDiscovery and information governance, both domestically and abroad. Maura is a well-known and influential eDiscovery lawyer. Her scholarly work on TAR, most notably, Technology-Assisted Review in E-Discovery Can Be More Effective and More Efficient Than Exhaustive Manual Review, published in the Richmond Journal of Law and Technology in 2011, has been widely cited in case law, both in the U.S. and elsewhere. Her longstanding contributions to eDiscovery technology and process were featured in the February 2016 issue of The American Lawyer and the September 2016 issue of the ABA Journal, where she was recognized asa “Legal Rebel.” In 2017, Maura was one of ten additions to the American Bar Association’s list of Women in Legal Tech;was named as one of the FastCase 50, which honors “the year’s smartest,most courageous innovators, techies, visionaries, and leaders in the law”; was honored by ACEDS and Women in eDiscovery as one of the “women who have served as pioneers and innovators in eDiscovery and legal technology”; and was appointed to the Balsillie School of International Affairs Artificial Intelligence and Human Rights Advisory Board. Maura has served as a court-appointed special master, neutral/mediator, and eDiscovery expert to the court in multiple high-profile federal cases, and has also taught courses in eDiscovery at Columbia, Pace, and Rutgers–Newark law schools. In addition to her J.D. from Georgetown, Maura also holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Psychology from the Derner Institute at Adelphi University.